19th to 21st of May 2020

Nodosa Shipyard trace the route that guarantees naval future

It was born as auxiliary, and it is today one of the most important companies in Pontevedra’s Bay. The bet for updating and investigation have strengthened competitivity and caught the attention of customers.

Cranes never stopped scratching Marin’s sky, neither at crisis time. It was not on buildings construction, but on maintenance and repairing fishing boats jobs and also building new boats. Nodosa Shipyard has become one of the economic and labour lungs in Pontevedra’s Bay. More than 600 jobs, direct and indirectly connected to this company that was born as auxiliary from Barreras and Ascón and that nowadays rub shoulders with big European shipyards. This is the story of success, that trace the way to continue by the Galician naval sector.

Currently working load for more than two years and ten vessels for several recently finished fishing ground or in different construction phases consigns the good company management. Mr Rafael Outeiral, Nodosa Shipyard Finance Director, lives with devotion his company achievements. Step by step, but with strong feet, this shipyard was tracing its destiny, with tenacity, quality, innovation and a bet, sometimes risky on the internalization. That is right, they have never forgotten their roots and a good part of the working load is dedicated to ships repairing. In this way arrived years ago, for example, the Basque tuna boats refurbishing that fish nowadays on the Indian Ocean. Nodosa Shipyard show off their relationship with Galicia and Mr Outeiral remembers to have built during the 80’s and 90’s a bit more than 500 “bateeiros” -fishing boats- on their facilities.

The market diversification was one of their goals they have surpassed. Mr Outeiral points out the company has gone for two new niches: drags and tugboats. Here was launched in 2013 the Moustakball II, the biggest broken-hull drag done in Spain. “The design was fully ours” explains Outeiral. Vessels for the Atlantic South, the Argos Cíes, a 74m length freezer vessel launched last year, is another landmark of the recent career path. “This is the biggest fishing boat up to now for the British-Hispanic fleet”, explains Outeiral. If this shipyard stands out at something is for making a good impression. The Monteferro ship-owners were so satisfied with the tugboat for Atlantic South and delivered by 2017, that they ordered another ship with the same characteristics. They are two examples of a quality strategic management that places once again Galician naval sector worldwide.

(Source: La Voz de Galicia)

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